Skagit Valley Hospital

Update: Take My Check or Forget It

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If you read my blog post of 11/3/10, you’ll remember that I was feeling put out by an arts organization I support and their desire that I pay my pledge via credit card versus my desire to pay by check.

One of my colleagues suggested I contact the organization’s development director and share my thoughts. I did, via email. I held my check, waiting for a reply. I never got one.

This past week, I was called by the organization again. The caller was friendly, clear about the community benefit of my gift, and asked me to give. Since I hadn’t fulfilled my November pledge and I do believe in their mission, I agreed. When she wanted to use my credit card, I said no, I’d prefer to send a check. And that’s where it started again. She told me that it cost the organization too much money to send out pledge cards because people don’t send them back. I repeated that I would like to send a check. She said it took money away from the organization. I told her that if she wanted my gift, they would need to accept a check. Finally, she agreed, clearly frustrated, and said that if I wanted to send a check, I’d have to send it in myself and asked if I had a pen so I could take down the organization’s address.

I was flabbergasted. Is it really not worth your time and effort to accept such an “old-fashioned” method of payment? What if I had a history of larger donations? Would you accept my check graciously then?

This weekend, I was at the venue to see a performance and since I was there, I hand-delivered my donation check to the box office. The woman smiled and thanked me. I fulfilled my pledge. It’s the last donation – no matter what the method of payment – that they will receive from me.

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About the Author

Dana Van Nest

Dana Van Nest

Marketing Director

Dana is Collins’ go-to person for connecting with potential clients, overseeing all our communications strategies, and maintaining strong relationships with professional associations and industry colleagues.

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